Gathering links, articles, news, videos and whatever else I think is of interest in the children's illustrating, writing, and publishing world.
justpicturethis:

A new blog is getting started. It looks very promising. Created by librarian Elizabeth, she is celebrating great Children’s literature with a special focus on those with Chicken leads. Matt Phelan is her first interviewee with a blue chicken! And check out his handy work for the blog banner. 
via @aliciapadron & @JannieHo 

justpicturethis:

A new blog is getting started. It looks very promising. Created by librarian Elizabeth, she is celebrating great Children’s literature with a special focus on those with Chicken leads. Matt Phelan is her first interviewee with a blue chicken! And check out his handy work for the blog banner. 

via @aliciapadron & @JannieHo 

2 years ago
4 notes

"The problem emerges, though, when we step back and actually look at what messages we’re sending within the images. Part of why many believe books are gendered — why some books are for boys and some are for girls — is because of the images and what they’re doing or saying. Even if the story itself doesn’t have a message about the female body within it, readers, especially teen girls who are already bombarded with a sickening number of messages about their bodies thanks to every other media they encounter, the cover is telling them something. It’s further offering up beliefs about the ideal image."

A critical look at the trends appearing on the covers of today’s YA novels and just what impact they could be having.

paperalligator:

So the lovely times a thousand Lindsay Nohl of Paper Bicycle and Light Grey Art Labs sent me a message a few weeks ago and just like that we started developing a special event! And now it’s official: June 16 and 17th (with some optional networking events Jun 15) I’ll be hosting an intensive workshop at LGAL in Minneapolis called ILLUSTRATION BOOTCAMP. It’s going to be really exciting, geared towards current illustrators and curious creative folk alike; I’m going to share my knowledge as an illustrator, get the creative energy flowing with some fun exercises, and then there’ll be awesome networking and collaboration activities. We’re working on getting some great guest speakers too. It’s going to be pretty amazing and reinvigorating for all who attend.
Lots of details on the website: the workshop costs $160 for locals, but we’re offering it as a travel opportunity too with a hotel package.  Please spread the word; I hope you can attend it and make this an awesome experience!

paperalligator:

So the lovely times a thousand Lindsay Nohl of Paper Bicycle and Light Grey Art Labs sent me a message a few weeks ago and just like that we started developing a special event! And now it’s official: June 16 and 17th (with some optional networking events Jun 15) I’ll be hosting an intensive workshop at LGAL in Minneapolis called ILLUSTRATION BOOTCAMP. It’s going to be really exciting, geared towards current illustrators and curious creative folk alike; I’m going to share my knowledge as an illustrator, get the creative energy flowing with some fun exercises, and then there’ll be awesome networking and collaboration activities. We’re working on getting some great guest speakers too. It’s going to be pretty amazing and reinvigorating for all who attend.


Lots of details on the website: the workshop costs $160 for locals, but we’re offering it as a travel opportunity too with a hotel package.  Please spread the word; I hope you can attend it and make this an awesome experience!

2 years ago
77 notes
"It can seem like every character in comics is wearing spandex. …and not just the superheroes.
Because so many artists struggle with how to draw clothes, characters often appear in tight, awkward, generic jeans and t-shirts that fit like Spidey’s tights.  A few small wrinkles around the joints doesn’t help to create a convincing illusion of reality.”
(via PaperWings)

"It can seem like every character in comics is wearing spandex. …and not just the superheroes.

Because so many artists struggle with how to draw clothes, characters often appear in tight, awkward, generic jeans and t-shirts that fit like Spidey’s tights.  A few small wrinkles around the joints doesn’t help to create a convincing illusion of reality.”

(via PaperWings)

2 years ago
2 notes